I Hope I Won’t See You Again!

The shoulder xrays were okay. In fact, the family doctor said I have a very good shoulder compared to many my age. (I am 63). It feels better and is getting better all the time. So not cancer. Whew!

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Yesterday I had a one o’clock appointment with my oncologist. We were told to arrive 20 minutes early, because of the lack of parking. A new cancer center is being built on the land next to the existing building, in the place of the parking lot. We had to park a long way from the cancer center doors.

It is winter and the walk was a bit chilly. Arrived early, of course, and since we are moving next month, I decided to change my address with the center. That killed a few minutes, as it meant an elevator ride back up to the main reception area and then back down again.

We waited to about a half hour past the appointment time. The nurse called me at last. As always, she checked my weight and took my blood pressure and heart rate measurements. Then she left, with a cheery “The doctor will be with you shortly.”

Waited. Waited some more. At last, at two o’clock the same nurse popped her head in to say that the doctor had got involved in a serious discussion, and would be in soon. She apologized and closed the door. Ten minutes went by, then fifteen.

Finally, the oncologist came in. She said that my August mammogram was fine and that she would turn me over to my family doctor from now on. She asked if I had any questions. I did not. I couldn’t think of anything.

Then she shook my hand, and said, “I hope that I don’t see you again!” And she laughed. So did I.

That done, she left the room and I put on my hat and coat and gloves and we left the building.

What a nice Christmas present.

I will continue to receive my anastrozole (Armidex) from the cancer center pharmacy, at no charge. It will be my family doctor who prescribes it rather than the oncologist.

I will have annual mammograms, so the next one will be in August 2017.

I can concentrate on the holidays, and on getting moved to our new home in January.

I suppose I can say that my journey through breast cancer is done. It is over. A tiny voice whispers in my ear, “For a while. Don’t be too hopeful.” I will ignore that voice. It is time to celebrate love and life and laughter.  And good health.

I have read over my posts since the cancer was first discovered. I think that cancer has changed me, and that it changes everyone it touches. In my case, I believe that I have come to maturity, not just in years, but in my attitude toward life. It is important for me to do things rather than have feelings of fear or regret.

I have hobbies and interests that keep my mind active. I am lucky to have a supportive family. I wish that for all of my readers as well.

For those of you who have been diagnosed HER2, I say that there is hope. Don’t give in to the little voice that says, “You are going to die!”

Be strong and you can get through this.

 

Third Chemotherapy

Well, the third treatment was a lot worse than the first two.  I was ill – a general feeling of illness, as though I had the flu – for about 10 days. I now feel better, just in time for this Friday’s bloodwork and appointment with the oncologist. The fourth and last chemotherapy is set for July 29th, so as long as the blood work is good that will go ahead.

I have had an appointment with the radiation oncologist, and on August 7th will have a CT scan and the marking will be done for the radiation treatments. I will see this doctor every Wednesday morning during the course of the 16 radiation treatments. They begin August 26th.

The doctor told me to use Glaxal Base cream on the breast, as the radiation can cause skin irritation, even like a sunburn. He says to leave the area exposed for an hour per day during the treatment. Also, he says the skin may darken. There may be damage to a small part of my right lung – there may be scarring there. There’s a tiny risk of developing cancer!