Diagnosis: Breast Cancer

The Call

My doctor phoned me just before supper, to let me know that the test results are in, and that I do have breast cancer.
He tells me that the cancer has not spread into the blood etc. and that he will make arrangements for me to have an appointment at the Cancer Centre. I asked him what kind of cancer I have. He replied that it is ductal.
I have read about ductal carcinoma and it is, apparently, the most common type.

I suppose I am still in shock about this, as I feel distanced from it all. I know that it is going to sink in soon though.

To Tell or Not

Many years ago, a therapist I was seeing told me I was a ‘stoic’. Perhaps that is why I have no intentions of telling anyone in my family about this, other than my husband, who is, thankfully, already being supportive.

I am not close to anyone else, and do not want the family to suddenly start paying attention to me just because I have cancer.
If they ignored me when I was well, I don’t need them now!

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The Biopsy

I arrived way early for the appointment. The traffic was flowing much better than I expected. I had a long wait, but was called in on time.
I had been told to not use aspirin or Advil for 48 hours before the test.

The Preparation

I was told to change into a short gown – and remove only the upper half of clothing.
I waited about 5 minutes for the test to begin.

The testing

First, I had an ultrasound. It took about 25 minutes. Painful, but not as bad as at the ‘regular’ lab.
After lying on the ultrasound table for about 20 minutes, the doctor/radiologist arrived.

The Biopsy

The two needles were inserted for freezing the areas.
This was at the six and eight o’clock positions. It hurt, but less than at the dentist’s for freezing before dental work.
Immediately, the radiologist inserted the needle for the testing. This is for the core biopsy. I heard the “click” each time
the needle was set to remove a sample, but it was not that startling and I did not react, only heard the sound. There were
about 8 to 10 clicks.

Then it was over. I went to the room where I had to put pressure on the breast for ten minutes, then I was able to get
dressed and leave.

Aftercare

I was told to not use aspirin or Advil for a while. I used Tylenol 3 when I got home and at bedtime.

I have to shower/bathe and apply a band-aid to the area/s – two areas in my case, at the six and eight o’clock positions, for
four days.

I have had my husband help me with the band aids – I have learned that I am a big sissy when it comes to looking after this.
At the third day, I felt more comfortable. Only Tylenol 3 at bedtime.
The bruising is still noticeable, but the pain is better.

I am still distanced from the reality that I am be facing breast cancer.

I will post again when I have the results.